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Basic Center Program

Grants to USA Nonprofits, IHEs, Agencies
to Assist Runaways and Homeless Youth

Agency Type:

Federal

Funding Source:

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) - Administration for Children and Families (ACF) - Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) - Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB)

Deadline Date:

07/05/18 4:30 PM ET Hard Copy Receipt; or 11:59 PM ET Electronic Submission

Description:

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Grants to USA nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and IHEs to provide counseling and shelter services for youth experiencing homelessness, trauma, neglect, or exposure to violence. Applicants are advised to verify or create the required registrations well in advance of the deadline date.

Executive Summary:

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) supports organizations and communities that work every day to put an end to youth homelessness, adolescent pregnancy, and domestic violence. FYSB’s Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Program is accepting applications for the Basic Center Program (BCP). The purpose of the BCP is to provide temporary shelter and counseling services to youth who have left home without permission of their parents or guardians, have been forced to leave home, or other homeless youth who might otherwise end up in contact with law enforcement or in the child welfare, mental health, or juvenile justice systems.

Program Description:

ACYF is committed to facilitating healing, recovery, and promoting the social and emotional well-being of children, youth, and families who have experienced homelessness, neglect, exposure to violence, and/or trauma. Awards governed by this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) and other discretionary spending from ACYF and FYSB are designed to ensure that effective interventions are in place to build skills and capacities that contribute to healthy, positive, and productive functioning of children and the healthy transition of youth into adulthood.

An important component of promoting social and emotional well-being includes addressing the impact of trauma, which can have a profound effect on the overall functioning of children, youth, and families. Efforts to address the impact of trauma are essential in cultivating social and emotional well-being; therefore, the RHY Program promotes a trauma-informed approach, which involves understanding and responding to the symptoms of chronic, interpersonal trauma and traumatic stress, and the behavioral and mental health consequences of trauma.

FYSB continues to support projects to prevent sexual exploitation and promote interventions within RHY Programs. These ongoing efforts seek to end sexual exploitation and trafficking incidents among runaway, homeless, and street youth and equip programs with the necessary tools to serve and identify youth victims or those at risk of becoming victims of sex or labor trafficking.

Project Description:

Pursuant to section 311(a)(2) of the RHY Act, projects will include, “(i) safe and appropriate shelter provided for not to exceed 21 days; and (ii) individual, family, and group counseling, as appropriate." Projects may include street-based services; home-based services for families with youth at risk of separation from the family; drug abuse education and prevention services; and at the request of runaway and homeless youth, testing for sexually transmitted diseases.

Pursuant to section 302(3) of the RHY Act, “Congress finds that services to such young people should be developed and provided using a positive youth development approach that ensures a young person a sense of:

-Safety and structure;
-Belonging and membership;
-Self-worth and social contribution;
-Independence and control over one’s life; and
-Closeness in interpersonal relationships

In addition to the statutory requirement set forth at section 302(3), section 1351.10 of the RHY Final Rule states, “Runaway and Homeless Youth grant services should have a positive youth development approach...."

The RHY Final Rule also states, at section 1351.23(i), projects, “...shall utilize and integrate into the operation of their projects the principles of positive youth development, including healthy messages, safe and structured places, adult role models, skill development, and opportunities to serve others.”

Pursuant to section 1351.30(b) of the RHY Final Rule, projects, “shall ensure that youth receive counseling services that are trauma-informed and match the individual needs of each client.” Additionally, as part of the service plan requirement, detailed at section 1351.1. Projects, “should incorporate the use of trauma-informed, evidence-based or evidence-informed interventions.”

Pursuant to section 312(b)(1) of the RHY Act, projects will operate a center in an area which is frequented by or easily reachable by runaway and homeless youth; provides temporary shelter that has, “a maximum capacity of not more than 20 youth, except where the [project]... has a State or local law or regulation that requires a higher maximum to comply with licensure requirements...” Projects must ensure that all shelters they operate are licensed and determine that any shelters to which they regularly refer clients have evidence of current licensure in states or localities with licensure requirements. Failure to adhere to licensing requirements outlined in 45 CFR § 1351.23(h) may result in disallowance of federal funds. Projects must also ensure proper relations with law enforcement personnel, health and mental health care personnel, social service personnel, school system personnel, and welfare personnel.

Additionally, though centers can provide temporary shelter for up to 21 days with HHS funding for youth, they may also seek to reunite young people with their families, when possible and appropriate, or to locate appropriate alternative placements.

Project Goal, Vision, and Outcomes:

Goal: The primary goal of the BCP is to provide temporary shelter and counseling services to youth, under the age of 18, who have left home without permission of their parents or guardians, have been forced to leave home, or other homeless youth who might end up in contact with law enforcement or in the child welfare, mental health, or juvenile justice systems.

Vision: Projects will have a vision to increase young people’s access to safe and stable housing, connections to school and employment, enhance social and emotional well-being, self- sufficiency, and help them build permanent connections with families, communities, schools, and other positive social networks, as required by the BCP performance standards set forth in the RHY Final Rule and corresponding measures detailed in Section VI.3. Reporting of this FOA.

The Project's vision will describe how achievement of Short-Term Outcomes will lead to achievement of specific Intermediate and Long-Term Outcomes.

-Long-Term Outcomes are outcomes that speak to a desired condition of the youth served. For the purposes of this FOA, the Long-Term Outcomes may include, but should not be limited to, the estimated number and percent of BCP youth graduating high school with a GPA of 2.5 or higher, and the number and percent not convicted of a crime, or the number and percent maintaining lasting, healthy relationships with family.

-Intermediate Outcomes relate primarily, though not exclusively, to sustained behavior changes in the youth served. For the purposes of this FOA, the Intermediate Outcomes may include, but should not be limited to, youth maintaining stable housing or pursuing education beyond high school or a GED.

-Short-Term Outcomes concern both the acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes and with the achievement in the BCP Performance Standards (i.e., social and emotional well-being, permanent connections, education or employment, and safe and stable housing) discussed below and set forth in the RHY Final Rule and detailed in Section VI. 3 Reporting. For more details about associated performance measures related to the BCP Performance Standards, see details in Section VI. 3 Reporting.

Grantees will not be required to collect and report on data on any program outputs measures or Long-Term and Intermediate Outcomes not specifically required under Section VI. 3 Reporting.

Performance Standards:

The RHY Final Rule establishes RHY Program Performance Standards as measures of successful outcomes for youth. The Performance Standards monitor Project performance in achieving the purposes of the RHY Act.

The RHY Final Rule requires BCP grantees to collect data that demonstrates their ability to meet the Performance Standards described in the Final Rule (45 CFR § 1351.30). Specifically, BCP Projects are required to measure goal attainment based on the four core outcomes: (1) social and emotional well-being; (2) permanent connections; (3) education or employment; and (4) stable housing. For more detail about associated performance measures associated with the BCP Performance Standards, see details in Section VI. 3 Reporting.

Through the provision of shelter and services, BCP youth under the age of 18 will realize improvements in four core outcome areas (i.e., social and emotional well-being, permanent connections, education or employment, and safe and stable housing). Indicators of improvements include but are not limited to:

-Social and emotional well-being: Youth will connect to system of care providers to assist with physical health, substance abuse, mental health, personal safety (e.g., identify potential trafficking situations), and sexual risk behaviors they may face.

-Permanent connections: Youth will experience ongoing attachments to families, communities, schools, and other social networks.

-Education or Employment: Youth will connect to school or vocational training programs, or improve interviewing skills, job attainment skills, and employment.

-Stable housing: Youth and their dependent child(ren) will transition to safe and stable housing to include: moving in with family or other permanent supportive housing.

In addition to meeting the four core outcomes, the RHY Final Rule also requires projects to ensure youth receive trauma-informed counseling services and gives projects the option to also provide home-based services, drug and/or alcohol abuse education and prevention services, and/or STD testing. BCP Projects need to report data on the types of counseling and services offered, participation rates, and completion rates if these services are offered. Finally, each BCP Project will ensure that youth exits from the project are safe and appropriate and report these data.

Project Approach:

Comprehensive Youth-Centered Service Model:

Projects must adhere to a Comprehensive Youth-Centered Service Model. The Comprehensive Youth-Centered Service Model suggests a holistic service approach as a promising practice when addressing the unique needs of runaway and homeless youth and young adults. Components of the Comprehensive Youth-Centered Service Model include:

Access to shelter: Projects shall provide youth, under the age of 18, shelter or safe and stable housing for up to 21 days and individual, family, and group counseling, as appropriate.

Pursuant to Section 311(a)(2)(C) of the RHY Act (34 U.S.C. 11211), projects may elect to provide street-based services; home-based services for families with youth at risk of separation from the family; drug abuse education and prevention services; and, at the request of runaway and homeless youth, testing for sexually transmitted diseases. (No bonus points will be given in the objective review for optional services, but the services must be coordinated with mandatory components of the program.) BCP Projects must screen and conduct assessment to identify youth who may become or are victims of human trafficking (sex and labor).

Shelter services must accommodate no fewer than 4 and not more than 20 youth, except where the grantee ensures that the state where the center or locally controlled facility is located has a state or local law or regulation that requires a higher maximum to comply with licensure requirements. Projects must ensure that staff are prepared and trained to interact with youth in crisis and youth victims of human trafficking. Shelter services for trafficked youth must be carefully identified by staff. Transportation to the shelter should be available as needed, and barriers to entry should be low enough that it is easily accessible by youth.

Gateway services: Project outreach staff must provide food, drink, referrals to shelter, clothing, transportation, and hygiene products and items to prevent malnutrition and ill-health while building trust with youth they encounter. Project outreach staff is also expected to build a rapport to discuss human trafficking prevention and identify youth who are at-risk of or victims of sexual exploitation or human trafficking.

Screening and Assessment: Projects must implement standardized methods to screen and assess each youth’s situation at contact, such as immediate needs; physical and behavioral health; connection to family; safety; access to resources; issues of neglect, trafficking, or abuse; and other risk and protective factors affecting well-being and self-sufficiency. The screening and assessment tool(s) must also be able to evaluate the unique needs of subpopulations of runaway and homeless youth such as, but not limited to, youth who are pregnant or parenting; running from a foster care setting; sexually exploited; victims of sex or labor trafficking; and in need of substance abuse or mental health services. FYSB has available a list of screening and assessment tools you can use to decide what type of interventions and services each young person may need. h

Coordinated Case Management: Coordinated case management is a central service within the BCP, as it ensures that youth have support in accessing a variety of services that are coordinated across multiple systems. Projects must provide intensive case management to youth receiving services; this will include services in place to address present and historical trauma, with access to a range of options for trauma-informed behavioral-health services.

Case management must involve the development of an individualized service plan that is tailored to meet the specific needs of the young person receiving services. In addition, projects must provide individual, family, and group counseling; ensure youth receive trauma-informed counseling services and have access to home-based services, drug and/or alcohol abuse education and prevention service, and/or sexually transmitted disease testing; and report data on the types of counseling and services offered, participation rates, and completion rates.

Follow-up/Aftercare Services: Pursuant to 45 CFR § 1351.26(a) of the RHY Final Rule, grantees must provide 3 months of follow-up services to youth who receives up to 21 days of shelter services from the BCP. Projects must establish an exit plan with youth within three days of receiving BCP services. The exit plan must include permanent placement planning that will help ensure the youth have the opportunity to make informed decisions about the support and services they need to receive, to develop a plan for permanency, and identify and achieve their personal goals.

Continuum Service Linkages: Projects must coordinate with others, such as government, nonprofits, other outreach teams, referral providers, and service providers, to ensure the ability to serve the runaway and homeless youth population.

Geographic Location: Projects must be located in areas where runaway, homeless, and street youth can easily access BCP services. This may include rural communities, tribal communities, or areas outside of metropolitan areas.

Pursuant to 45 CFR § 1351.23(e) and (f), projects must develop and implement a plan for addressing youth who have run away from foster care placement or correctional institutions, in accordance with federal, state, or local laws or regulations that apply to these situations. The projects must also take steps to ensure that youth who are or should be under the legal jurisdiction of the juvenile justice or child welfare systems obtain and receive services from those systems until such time as they are released from the jurisdiction of those systems.

Sustainability Plan: BCP Projects will plan for project sustainability from the beginning of the project design and revisit and revise the plan throughout the life of the project. Projects will sustain key elements of the project (e.g., strategies or services, prevention and intervention outcomes), that have been effective in improving practice and have led to improved outcomes after the project period has ended. Projects will work closely with their Federal Project Officer to review and revise – as needed – an ongoing sustainability plan strategy focused on leveraging non-federal funding and resources to support the program in the event federal funds are no longer available.

GrantWatch ID#:

GrantWatch ID#: 171943

Estimated Total Program Funding:

$15,225,563

Number of Grants:

Expected Number of Awards: 89

Estimated Size of Grant:

-Award Ceiling: $200,000 Per Project Period
-Award Floor: $50,000 Per Project Period
-Average Projected Award Amount: $171,074 Per Project Period

Term of Contract:

The anticipated project start date is 09/30/2018.

The grant covers a 36-month project period with three 12-month budget periods.

An initial grant award will be for a 12-month budget period. The award of continuation grants beyond the initial 12-month budget period will be subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory progress on the part of the grantee, and a determination that the continued funding would be in the best interest of the federal government.

Eligibility:

  • City or township governments
  • County governments
  • Independent school districts
  • Indian housing authorities
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
  • Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Private institutions of higher education
  • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Public housing authorities
  • See RFP and/or Grant Guidelines for full eligibility
  • Special district governments
  • State governments

Additional Eligibility Criteria:

Eligible Applicants:

Public and nonprofit entities and combinations of such entities are eligible to apply. For profit organizations are not eligible. Private institutions of higher education must be nonprofit entities.

In selecting eligible applicants under this FOA, the Secretary shall give priority to eligible applicants who have demonstrated experience in providing services to runaway and homeless youth.

Applications from individuals (including sole proprietorships) and foreign entities are not eligible and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Faith-based and community organizations that meet the eligibility requirements are eligible to receive awards under this funding opportunity announcement.

Funding Restrictions:

Costs of organized fund raising, including financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, and similar expenses incurred to raise capital or obtain contributions are unallowable. Fund raising costs for the purposes of meeting the Federal program objectives are allowable with prior written approval from the Federal awarding agency. (45 CFR §75.442)

Proposal costs are the costs of preparing bids, proposals, or applications on potential Federal and non-Federal awards or projects, including the development of data necessary to support the non-Federal entity's bids or proposals. Proposal costs of the current accounting period of both successful and unsuccessful bids and proposals normally should be treated as indirect (F&A) costs and allocated currently to all activities of the non-Federal entity. No proposal costs of past accounting periods will be allocable to the current period. (45 CFR §75.460)

Grant awards will not allow reimbursement of pre-award costs.

Construction is not an allowable activity or expenditure under this grant award.

Costs for acquisition and renovation of existing structures are authorized but may not exceed 15 percent of the grant amount awarded. (45 CFR § 1351.15 and § 1351.16)

Applicants are advised that no grant funds may be used for any program for distributing sterile needles or syringes for the hypodermic injection of any illegal drug. Prospective grantees are advised that entities receiving BCP grant funds and operating a program to distribute sterile needles or syringes for hypodermic injections of illegal drugs must account for all funds used for such programs separately from any expenditure of BCP grant funds.

Each year, the HHS appropriations includes a prohibition, stating that none of the funds appropriated may be expended for an abortion, except in cases where pregnancy is a result of rape or incest or where the woman suffers from a physical disorder, physical injury, or physical illness, including a life-endangering physical condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself, that would, as certified by a physician, place the woman in danger of death unless an abortion is performed.

Pre-Application Information:

Grantees are required to meet a non-federal share of the project cost, in accordance with section 383 of the RHY Act, (34 U.S.C. § 11274).

For all federal awards, any shared costs or matching funds and all contributions, including cash and third-party in-kind contributions, must be accepted as part of the recipient’s cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the criteria listed in 45 CFR 75.306.

The federal share of the BCP Project represents 90 percent of the total project cost supported by the federal government. The remaining 10 percent represents the required project match cost by the grantee. This may be a cash or in-kind contribution.

Matching requirements (including in-kind contributions) of less than $200,000 (up to $199,999) are waived under grants made to the governments of American Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (other than those consolidated under other provisions of 48 U.S.C. 1469) pursuant to 48 U.S.C. 1469a(d). This waiver applies whether the matching required under the grant equals or exceeds $200,000.

All applicants must have a DUNS Number (http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform) and an active registration with the System for Award Management (SAM.gov/SAM, https://www.sam.gov).

All applicants are required to maintain an active SAM registration until the application process is complete. If a grant is awarded, registration at SAM must be active throughout the life of the award.

Plan ahead. Allow at least 10 business days after you submit your registration for it to become active in SAM and at least an additional 24 hours before that registration information is available in other government systems, i.e. Grants.gov.

The deadline for electronic application submission is 11:59 PM ET on July 5, 2018.

The deadline for receipt of paper applications is 4:30 PM ET on July 5, 2018. Paper applications received from applicants that have not received approval of an exemption from required electronic submission will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

View this opportunity on Grants.gov:
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=HHS-2018-ACF-ACYF-CY-1354

Contact Information:

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Program Office Contact:

Gloria Watkins
Administration for Children and Families
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
Family and Youth Services Bureau, Headquarters
330 C Street, SW.
Switzer Building, Third Floor, Room 3617c
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: (202) 205-9546
Email: Gloria.Watkins@acf.hhs.gov

Office of Grants Management Contact:

Katrina Morgan
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Grants Management
330 C Street, SW.
Switzer Building, Third Floor, Room 3204
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: (202) 401-5127
Email: katrina.Morgan@acf.hhs.gov

CFDA Number:

93.623

Funding or Pin Number:

HHS-2018-ACF-ACYF-CY-1354

URL for Full Text (RFP):

Geographic Focus:

USA: Alabama;   Alaska;   Arizona;   Arkansas;   California;   Colorado;   Connecticut;   Delaware;   Florida;   Georgia;   Hawaii;   Idaho;   Illinois;   Indiana;   Iowa;   Kansas;   Kentucky;   Louisiana;   Maine;   Maryland;   Massachusetts;   Michigan;   Minnesota;   Mississippi;   Missouri;   Montana;   Nebraska;   Nevada;   New Hampshire;   New Jersey;   New Mexico;   New York City;   New York;   North Carolina;   North Dakota;   Ohio;   Oklahoma;   Oregon;   Pennsylvania;   Rhode Island;   South Carolina;   South Dakota;   Tennessee;   Texas;   Utah;   Vermont;   Virginia;   Washington, DC;   Washington;   West Virginia;   Wisconsin;   Wyoming