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Positive Organizing Project (POP)

Grants to USA, Puerto Rico, and US Virgin Islands Nonprofits
to Increase Grassroots Engagement of Individuals Living with HIV

GrantWatch ID#: 175462
Agency Type:

Foundation / Corporation

AIDS United and Gilead Sciences

07/26/17

08/14/17 5:00 PM ET

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Grants ranging from $20,000 to $40,000 to USA, Puerto Rico, and US Virgin Islands nonprofit organizations to support grassroots engagement and mobilization among individuals living with HIV. Funding will support service delivery systems that directly impact HIV-related stigma, enhance the policy and community environment for inclusive and effective HIV programs, and indirectly improve outcomes along the continuum of care.

Statement of Need:

In the thirty-six years since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first cases of what would later be defined as HIV, biomedical interventions and access to quality care have transformed HIV from a once-fatal disease to a chronic manageable condition. This progress would not have been possible without the advocacy and leadership of people living with HIV who were the driving force behind pushing for HIV cure and treatment research with urgency.

The people living with HIV self-empowerment movement began when an advisory committee of people living with AIDS convened in Denver, Colorado in 1983 and drafted the Denver Principles. These principles of “Nothing about us without us” laid the foundation for the concept of Meaningful Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS (MIPA).

Meaningful Involvement of People Living with HIV (MIPA):

At its most basic, MIPA is the meaningful involvement of people living with HIV in the development, implementation, resolution and evaluation of programs and policies which impact their lives.
MIPA assumes that:

-People living with HIV are subject matter experts in the issues that they face and have the right to participate in decision-making processes about issues that affect their lives;
-Those most affected by issues are integral to identifying sustainable solutions to address them;
-People living with HIV who are involved must be reflective of the local community affected by HIV; and
-Efforts to ensure involvement should emphasize populations often ignored or excluded from decision-making.

MIPA does not assume that all people living with HIV can be represented by a single person, or that perspectives are race and gender-neutral. Because disclosure of HIV status can be dangerous, MIPA also does not require disclosure of HIV status for participation.

MIPA is more than tokenistic representation and participation. True meaningful involvement requires that people living with HIV understand their role at the table, have a decision-making voice (including the capacity to say no without repercussions), and are resourced appropriately to participate. Efforts should be made to ensure that all people living with HIV affected by a decision can participate in making that decision, including addressing accessibility concerns. Thus, MIPA builds in the processes necessary for effective and productive coalitions of people living with HIV.

Applicants may propose projects that address any of the following:

Community issues:

HIV-related stigma is prejudice against people and populations based on perceived HIV sero-positive status. This prejudice may be institutionalized through policies, such as HIV criminalization, or enacted at the individual or community level. Applicants may propose addressing HIV-related stigma through institutional, community-level, or individual interventions, including policy change.

Building capacity for people living with HIV involvement in state-level advocacy. There is a need to build capacity among people living with HIV to meaningfully participate in and lead state-level advocacy efforts. Applicants may propose projects that support and enhance participation of people living with HIV in state level advocacy and policy work.

Organizational and community issues:

Structural barriers to MIPA may derive from complex historical and current processes that intersect with stigma and oppression related to race, gender, gender expression and identity, sexual orientation, class, opportunities for formal education, mental illness, HIV status, and more. Applicants may propose organizational and institutional interventions to reduce these barriers, including addressing organizational policies that may reduce participation by disproportionately affected communities in decision making roles.

Leadership development is a central tenet of MIPA. At the organizational level, this could include processes that prepare people living with HIV to participate at the board level, to apply for jobs with the organization, develop an active and engaged advisory board, and to organize networks of people living with HIV to address local and regional challenges.

Organizational culture can affect participation by people living with HIV, especially for people of color and people of trans experience. Applicants may propose initiatives to improve organizational culture. Such efforts should be developed and led by people from the affected communities, and proposals should have clearly articulated problems along with potential solutions.

Expected Goals and Outcomes, Priorities, and Minimum Requirements:

All applicants must demonstrate how their proposed project will help achieve increased grassroots mobilization of people living with HIV, identify and develop leaders living with HIV or increase organizational meaningful involvement of people living with HIV.

-Grassroots mobilization should include people living with HIV in the identification of the challenge and in the planned response. This could include local, state, or national advocacy campaigns led by people living with HIV to address HIV issues.

-Developing leaders living with HIV could include identifying a cohort of people living with HIV, supporting them as they identify skills sets, seek training opportunities and continue to develop their leadership. This might result in seats on planning councils, community boards of directors, staff positions, or elected office.

-Meaningful Involvement of people living with HIV at the organizational level requires that people living with HIV understand their role at the table, have a decision-making voice (including the capacity to say no without repercussions), and are resourced appropriately to participate. This may include an organizational commitment to mentor board members living with HIV, ensure internships or staff positions for people living with HIV or to create a Community Advisory Board (CAB) with measurable organizational impact.

In all of the areas, efforts should be made to ensure that all people living with HIV who are affected by a decision can participate in making that decision, including addressing accessibility concerns. Thus, MIPA builds in the processes necessary for effective and productive coalitions of people living with HIV.

People living with HIV should be involved in the grant development and application. This grant is very specific to developing leaders living with HIV or supporting people living with HIV in mobilization. Successful applicants will discuss the current state of involvement of people living with HIV and identify the impact this grant will have on that engagement.

Funding is available for two different types of projects; both are intended to increase meaningful involvement of communities affected by HIV.

1. Building a MIPA-driven Organization: projects addressing organizational and institutional barriers to meaningful involvement, focusing on concrete activities to strengthen the organizational practices and operationalize MIPA values at the organizational level. Examples of this may include developing an organizational plan to increase leadership of people living with HIV on staff or the board of directors in clear and concrete ways, or to create decision-making mechanisms that meaningfully integrate input and direction from people living with HIV into the organization.

2. MIPA-driven Grassroots Projects: Building capacity for people living with HIV to be involved in policy and advocacy change. Projects focused on specific grassroots activities that are led by people living with HIV. Examples of this may include creating an anti-stigma education campaign, mobilizing and community organizing, and direct advocacy.

For consideration, both project types will need to have a clearly defined event or activity with measurable outcomes demonstrating objectives and outreach to members of the HIV community.

Priority will be given to applicants that can provide clear plans and demonstrated capacity to ensure that people living with HIV who are reflective of the communities affected are involved in developing and leading efforts to combat stigma, improving the policy or legal environment, and/or ensuring effective programs.

Grant awards will range between $20,000 and $40,000.

This funding will cover a project implementation period of 8 months. The grant period begins October 1, 2017 and ends June 30, 2018.

Regional, community and faith-based organizations, including but not limited to AIDS service organizations, Federally Qualified Health Centers, and/or established networks of people living with HIV are invited to apply as long as they meet the following eligibility requirements:

-Documented Nonprofit Status: Applicants must be non-profit, tax-exempt organizations, per the guidelines set forth by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) with proper 501(c)3 status. Appropriate verification of this federal status will be undertaken by AIDS United before final grant decisions are made. Only organizations located in the United States, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands may apply. Organizations that do not hold 501(c)3 status must have an already established relationship with a fiscal sponsor, holding such status, in order to apply.

-Organizational Viability: Organizations should be viable with or without the grant. These funds are not intended to provide general support, help start new organizations or serve as a replacement for discontinued funding.

Grant funds may not be used for:
-Direct services;
-Direct or grassroots lobbying;
-Expenses not directly related to the proposed project;
-Medications or medical care;
-Facility acquisition or renovation;
-Deficit reduction or debt payment;
-Displacement of existing funding sources;
-Indirect expenses over 15%; or
-Program or organizational development

AIDS United will offer an applicant content/technical assistance webinar to go over the application and answer any questions.

The webinar is scheduled for Wednesday, July 26, 2017 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM EDT.

The virtual meeting will take up to ninety minutes.

The following outlines key benchmarks for the initiative:
July 14, 2017: Requests for Proposals released
July 26, 2017: Application technical assistance/content webinar
August 14, 2017: Complete applications due at 5:00 PM ET
September 18, 2017: Approved applicants will be notified of funding decision
September 20, 2017: Negotiation of final targets and execution of grant agreements
October 1, 2017: Grant period begins
October 6, 2017: Grantee orientation webinar with AIDS United & the HIV Caucus
January 2018: Two-day grantee convening in Washington, DC*
March 2018: Mid-project Progress Monitoring Call
March 2018: AIDSWatch (End of March Dates TBD)
June 15, 2018: Program activities concluded
June 30, 2018: Grant period ends and final progress report due

*All grantees are required to have a program lead (who is a person living with HIV) attend the January convening in Washington, DC.

Meaningful Involvement of People with HIV/AIDS (MIPA) Resources:
https://www.aidsunited.org/resources/meaningful-involvement-of-people-with-hivaids-mipa

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Register for the July 26 Webinar:
https://events-na12.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1312162002/en/events/event/shared/1591605926/event_registration.html?sco-id=1727257207&_charset_=utf-8

Apply Online:
https://aidsunited.foundationconnect.org/GrantsManager/Pages/EligibilityQuiz.aspx?OrgID=00Di0000000JkIY&QuizID=a0L1Y00000TzgQl

For programmatic questions, email pop@aidsunited.org with your organization’s name in the subject line of the message.

You may also contact:

Julio Fonseca
(202) 876-2835
jfonseca@aidsunited.org

AIDS United
1424 K Street, N.W., Suite 200
Washington, DC 20005

See the full text of this grant

USA: Alabama;   Alaska;   Arizona;   Arkansas;   California;   Colorado;   Connecticut;   Delaware;   Florida;   Georgia;   Hawaii;   Idaho;   Illinois;   Indiana;   Iowa;   Kansas;   Kentucky;   Louisiana;   Maine;   Maryland;   Massachusetts;   Michigan;   Minnesota;   Mississippi;   Missouri;   Montana;   Nebraska;   Nevada;   New Hampshire;   New Jersey;   New Mexico;   New York City;   New York;   North Carolina;   North Dakota;   Ohio;   Oklahoma;   Oregon;   Pennsylvania;   Rhode Island;   South Carolina;   South Dakota;   Tennessee;   Texas;   Utah;   Vermont;   Virginia;   Washington, DC;   Washington;   West Virginia;   Wisconsin;   Wyoming

USA Territories: Puerto Rico (USA)   Virgin Islands (USA)

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