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Community Resilience Grants Program (Resilience Grants)

Grants to Maryland Local Governments to Reduce
Environmental Damage from Stormwater Runoff

Agency Type:

State

Funding Source:

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Maryland Department of Natural Resources - Chesapeake and Coastal Service (CCS)

Conf. Date:

01/18/18

LOI Date:

01/26/18

Deadline Date:

03/02/18 11:59 PM

Description:

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Grants to Maryland local government agencies and nonprofit organizations to address climate-related flooding hazards in designated coastal areas. The purpose of this program is to address the threat flood events present to natural resources, communities, and infrastructure throughout the state.

The Chesapeake and Coastal Service (CCS) is soliciting project proposals that will help address the impacts of climate-related hazards through the Community Resilience Grants Program (Resilience Grants). Projects can be proposed to address coastal impacts (storm surge, shoreline erosion, sea level rise, nuisance flooding, etc.), stormwater hazards, and floodplain flood risks. Proposals should address one of three project phases: Understand, Plan, or Implement.

The Resilience Grants encourage projects that take a holistic, watershed-scale planning approach to address both water quantity and quality. Ideal projects will foster innovative adaptation strategies that ensure that Maryland communities are increasingly resilient to flood risks, work to ascertain that Bay and ocean waters meet living resource and human needs, and serve to enhance the protection and management of the state’s resources. Projects should help communities more clearly communicate the risks associated with hazards in order to better protect citizens, infrastructure, and natural resources.

Grants this year are made possible by funding provided by the State of Maryland, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Maryland's Community Resilience Grants Program combines the funding previously available through the CoastSmart Communities and Green Infrastructure Resiliency grant programs. The state is better able to promote and support comprehensive, holistic planning and implementation projects through this revised solicitation by leveraging federal dollars with newly available state funds to address resiliency in Maryland.

Background and Intent of Funding:

The damages and impacts resulting from flood events present a substantial threat to communities, infrastructure and natural resources throughout the state. Since 2007, Maryland has experienced four hurricane and flood events warranting Presidential Disaster Declarations, resulting in more than $95 million in federal public assistance. is solicitation requests actions that can be taken before a flood event to reduce the risk to life, property, and natural resources. The funds will be used for projects that seek to achieve this reduced risk in whatever manner is most feasible for the local community. is solicitation encourages projects that address both coastal impacts and stormwater and floodplain impacts.

Coastal Impacts:

Extending over 3,000 miles along the diverse landscape of the Chesapeake Bay, the Coastal Bays, and the Atlantic Ocean, Maryland’s shoreline is highly susceptible to coastal hazards. In Maryland, these hazards are both episodic (hurricanes, nor’easters, floods, nuisance flooding, and storm surge) and chronic (sea- level rise, land subsidence, and erosion) in nature. Almost 70% of Maryland’s shoreline experiences chronic erosion and up to 60% of some counties lie within FEMA’s Special Flood Hazard Area.

This grant program aims to support local governments located in Maryland’s coastal zone integrate planning scenarios into day-to-day decision making (e.g. variances, permits, etc.) and long-term strategic planning (e.g. major infrastructure updates, community visioning, designating growth and intense development areas, etc.) to be better prepared for the next flood event. is includes increasing the awareness of residents, business owners, elected officials, and planners around what hazards exist now and into the future and what actions can be taken to maintain a community’s identity and cultural heritage, while acknowledging changes that could impact that vision. Potential projects include flood vulnerability and risk assessments, updates to planning documents (e.g. hazard mitigation plans, zoning ordinances, building codes, floodplain ordinances, comprehensive plans), education and outreach campaigns and materials and support of a community's participation in FEMA’s Community Rating System (CRS). All projects should integrate risk reduction into day-to-day planning processes to reduce overall flood risk from tide-influenced and/or rain and storm events.

New this year, funds can be utilized to design and permit natural and nature-based shoreline stabilization and flood reduction projects. Projects may consist of shoreline and buffer restoration, beneficial use of dredge materials, tidal marsh restoration, dune restoration, or other nature-based solutions that provide community and ecosystem benefits by restoring, enhancing, or creating coastal habitat. These coastal resilience practices help to attenuate wave energy, stabilize sediment and absorb water, acting as natural buffers from the impacts of coastal storms and other climate impacts. In addition to protecting critical coastal infrastructure, these practices can also address public access, vital habitats, and environmental justice. Once a project is designed and permitted, CCS will work with the partners to fund the construction of the project, but construction funding is not guaranteed. Applicants cannot propose construction projects without first receiving funding for design and permitting through this grant program.

In order to receive funding to address coastal impacts, the project must be located within Maryland’s designated coastal zone, which consists of Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Calvert, Caroline, Cecil, Charles, Dorchester, Harford, Kent, Prince George’s, Queen Anne’s, St. Mary’s, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester counties and Baltimore City.

Stormwater and Floodplain Impacts:

Maryland’s precipitation regime is changing. Annual precipitation totals in Maryland have become more variable since 1970, and our winters are anticipated to become wetter. Since 1958 the amount of precipitation that has occurred in extreme events in the eastern United States has increased by twenty-five percent, and extreme weather events are expected to become even more frequent and intense. Larger and more frequent precipitation events will increase stormwater runoff, which may overwhelm stormwater management systems designed for smaller storms. Riparian flooding is also likely to increase as a result of the changing precipitation regime. An increase in the incidence and severity of flooding will cause increased damages and further degrade water quality.

is grant program aims to help Maryland communities assess localized flood risks resulting from more frequent and intense precipitation events and address those risks by implementing targeted green infrastructure projects. Green infrastructure practices - such as rain gardens, bioretention facilities, and permeable pavement - reduce flooding by helping stormwater infiltrate in place rather than contributing to runoff. As a result, these practices have the dual benefits of managing water quantity while also improving water quality. Potential projects include watershed assessments that focus on determining local flood risks and how green infrastructure can be used to address those risks and site- or watershed- level green infrastructure implementation plans and project designs. Once a project is designed and permitted, CCS will work with the partners to fund the construction of the project, but construction funding is not guaranteed. Applicants cannot propose construction projects without first receiving funding for design and permitting through this grant program.

To receive funding to address stormwater or floodplain hazards, the community must be located within the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Please note that projects proposed in Cecil, Garrett and Worcester counties must be located within the portions of those counties that are within the watershed in order to be eligible.

Phases:

Project proposals must be submitted under one of the three following phases: Understand, Plan, or Implement. Each phase reflects where a local community may be in preparedness. Projects submitted under all phases will receive equal consideration for funding. Each phase is meant to build upon complementary tasks such as community engagement.

Phase 1 - Understand:

Local governments that have yet to complete a formal assessment of the risk natural hazards pose to their community are encouraged to submit a project proposal under Phase 1. Projects in this category should propose bringing together existing resources and data (such as hazard mitigation plans and Flood Insurance Rate Maps) to develop a holistic understanding of what is at-risk (built and natural infrastructure) to tidal, stormwater or riparian flooding.

Examples of projects may include:
-Model dynamic processes, such as erosion, coastal flooding, or stormwater flow
-Model marsh migration under the MD Climate Change Commission scenarios
-Assess vulnerability of natural resources, recreational and public access, and built infrastructure to flooding and/or MD Climate Change Commission sea level rise scenarios
-Conduct assessments to determine how green infrastructure practices could reduce flooding risks

Phase 2 – Plan:

Local governments that have quantified and understand their vulnerability and risk are encouraged to apply for a grant in this category. Under Phase 2, projects will use data from vulnerability assessments and other existing resources to either research and evaluate current planning processes for how and where to integrate hazard planning strategies or move forward with updating and adopting updated planning processes. These projects should result in higher regulatory standards and risk-reduction strategies. Applicants must identify a program change (change in local policies) for which the funding is being sought.

Examples of projects may include:
-Update and adopt planning processes such as hazard mitigation plans, small area flood mitigation plans, critical areas plans, floodplain ordinances, building codes, zoning ordinances, and/or long-term plans
-Develop or integrate a green infrastructure plan to address coastal, stormwater, or floodplain hazards
-Maintain membership in, or apply to, FEMA’s Community Rating System (CRS)
-Assess or evaluate impacted infrastructure (built or natural) with the intent to address current and anticipated flood impacts

Phase 3 – Implement:

Local governments and nonprofit organizations can submit proposals under this phase to design and permit a resilience project that addresses coastal hazards, stormwater hazards, and/or floodplain management needs. Proposals must be for natural and nature-based resilience projects (i.e. green infrastructure); gray infrastructure (such as bulkheads, conventional stormwater system upgrades and sea walls) will not be funded. CCS can assist applicants to define and identify potential green infrastructure projects that will increase their resilience to specific climate hazards.

Once a project is designed and permitted, CCS will work with the partners to fund the construction of the project, but construction funding is not guaranteed. Applicants cannot propose construction projects without first receiving funding for design and permitting through this grant program.

Examples of projects may include:
-Design a green infrastructure practice that will address previously-determined stormwater risks anticipated due to climate change
-Design an innovative coastal resilience project that will restore or enhance natural features (such as high and low marsh, dunes, coastal forest buffer, and near-shore habitats) while protecting critical infrastructure

GrantWatch ID#:

GrantWatch ID#: 178101

Estimated Size of Grant:

Phase 1 proposals may request up to $75,000.

Phase 2 proposals may request up to $75,000.

Phase 3 proposals may request up to $100,000.

Term of Contract:

Projects may begin no earlier than June - October 2018 depending on funding source.

Phase 1 projects will be a maximum of one year in duration.

Phase 2 projects will be a maximum of one year in duration.

Phase 3 projects will be a maximum of two years in duration.

Additional Eligibility Criteria:

Eligible Applicants:

Local Governments: Local governments are eligible to propose projects under all phases. Applications must be submitted by a representative of a local government (county or municipality) and the government entity must be the funding recipient if selected.

Nonprofits: Charitable or religious nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for funding for Phase 3 projects only. Nonprofit organizations must submit a letter of support from a local government representative as well as be registered, in compliance and in good standing with the Maryland Secretary of State.

Other organizations are encouraged to partner with an eligible entity.

Pre-proposal Conference:

The following information sessions are available:

-Eastern Shore: Eastern Shore: January 16, 2018
-Western Shore: January 18, 2018

Pre-Application Information:

Interested applicants are encouraged to submit a letter of intent. Please note that although they are encouraged to be submitted by January 26, 2018, letters of intent are not required but will assist CCS staff in working with interested communities to identify and scope a proposal prior to the solicitation deadline.

All proposals must be submitted through the CCS Grants Online website.

Each project proposal will receive an initial screening by the CCS to ensure the application meets basic eligibility criteria. CCS staff may follow up with applicants to discuss the projects further. Eligible proposals will then be evaluated by an inter-agency review team on general project content, incorporation of natural resource issues, how well the project proposes to address climate hazards, upcoming development issues, level of community engagement, transferability and readiness to proceed.

After review, CCS staff will work with selected candidates to complete the final scope of work for the project and discuss timing needs to ensure project outcomes are met on time.

Proposals will be due to the Department of Natural Resources by 11:59 PM on Friday, March 2, 2018 through the CCS web-based grants management service, Grants Online.

Solicitation Schedule:
-Solicitation Issued: December 2017
-Information Session - Eastern Shore: January 16, 2018
-Information Session - Western Shore: January 18, 2018
-Letter of Intent Due: January 26, 2018
-Proposals Due on CCS Grants Online: March 2, 2018 (11:59 PM)
-Proposal Initial Screening: March 5-9, 2018
-Proposal Review and Evaluation: March 12-30, 2018
-Project Selection: April 13, 2018
-Finalize Task Descriptions and Budget for Final Scope of Work: April 27, 2018
-Project Funding to begin no earlier than: June-October 2018 depending on funding source

Contact Information:

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Apply online through the CCS Grants Online website at:
http://mesgis.com/GrantsOnLine/Login.aspx

For projects addressing coastal impacts within Phases 1 or 2:

Sasha Land
P: 410.260.8718
F: 410.260.8739
sasha.land@maryland.gov

Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Chesapeake and Coastal Service
580 Taylor Ave., E-2
Annapolis, MD 21401

For projects addressing coastal impacts within Phase 3:

Nicole Carlozo
P: 410.260.8726
F: 410.260.8739
nicole.carlozo@maryland.gov

Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Chesapeake and Coastal Service
580 Taylor Ave., E-2
Annapolis, MD 21401

For projects addressing stormwater or floodplain impacts within all phases:

Megan Granato
P: 410.260.8799
F: 410.260.8739
megan.granato@maryland.gov

Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Chesapeake and Coastal Service
580 Taylor Ave., E-2
Annapolis, MD 21401

URL for Full Text (RFP):

Geographic Focus:

USA: Maryland: Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Calvert, Caroline, Cecil, Charles, Dorchester, Harford, Kent, Prince George’s, Queen Anne’s, St. Mary’s, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties and Baltimore City