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Supporting Tribal Youth: Training and Technical Assistance and Youth Leadership Development

Grants to USA Nonprofits, For-Profits, Agencies, and
IHEs to Prevent Delinquency Among Tribal Youth

Agency Type:

Federal

Funding Source:

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U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)

Deadline Date:

06/18/18 11:59 PM ET

Description:

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Grants to USA and territories nonprofits, for-profits, government agencies, and IHEs for efforts to prevent delinquency and crime among tribes and tribal youth. Applicants are advised to verify or create the required registrations well in advance of the deadline date. Selected grantees will provide training and technical assistance to all federally recognized tribes around juvenile justice issues, including intensive support to OJJDP’s tribal program grantees.

A second award category exists to further the National Intertribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative by supporting and enhancing tribal youth engagement, coordination, and action related to juvenile justice, delinquency prevention, and public safety issues in Indian country. This program furthers the Department’s mission to prevent crime and delinquency and build resiliency by providing culturally appropriate training, support, resources, information, and other related technical assistance to assist tribes and tribal youth.

There are two categories of funding available as part of this solicitation. Eligible applicants must designate the category for which they are applying. It is allowable for the same organization to apply to serve as the primary applicant for funding in both Category 1 and Category 2.

For both categories, the successful applicants will work closely with OJJDP throughout the award period on substantive issues and deliverables, and will coordinate and collaborate with OJJDP’s current and future training and technical assistance efforts and providers. OJJDP will expect the successful applicants to build on the accomplishments and activities of the past efforts.

Category 1 – Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance:

OJJDP is seeking a tribal youth training and technical assistance provider to provide culturally based, trauma-informed training, support, and other related technical assistance to all OJJDP- funded tribal program grantees, as well as all other interested federally recognized tribes, to build capacity to develop, expand, improve, and/or maintain their juvenile justice systems. This includes support for courts, probation, prosecutors and other key stakeholders charged with responding to juvenile crime as well as an intentional focus on prevention programs targeting risk and protective factors for juvenile delinquency. When allocating training and technical assistance resources, the currently funded OJJDP tribal program grantees will receive priority services. Priority areas include juvenile healing-to-wellness courts; tribal youth-specific prevention, intervention, and treatment programming; and tribal-state juvenile justice collaborations to meet the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. The successful applicant will collaborate closely with OJJDP’s other training and technical assistance efforts and providers.

Category 2 – Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative:

This program category is seeking to build on the successes of the past OJJDP National Intertribal Youth Leadership efforts and the Today’s Native Leaders program to support building youth leadership skills within tribal communities. This initiative aims to enhance tribal efforts to increase youth engagement, improve leadership skills, and support action related to juvenile justice issues, delinquency prevention, and public safety issues in Indian country. The successful applicant will work with tribal communities to identify and engage youth with multiple risk factors (i.e., individual, family, community) to participate in learning events that will build youth leadership skills as part of a risk-focused delinquency prevention approach. The goal of this approach is to provide these youth with the opportunity to create a sustainable community project focused on reducing risk factors for juvenile crime and enhancing protective factors for youth accountability.

Project-Specific Information:

Category 1 – Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance:

OJJDP partners with and provides grant support to tribes around diverse types of youth programming. The successful applicant will deliver training and technical assistance across a variety of topics that are integral to the establishment and sustainability of programs that promote positive outcomes for tribal youth.

These topics may include:
-Juvenile healing-to-wellness courts.
-Court services and pre-adjudication diversion services.
-Culturally based and traditional approaches to juvenile delinquency prevention and intervention.
-Bullying prevention activities.
-Afterschool programming.
-Development of a graduated sanctions continuum for youth offenders.
-Prevention and treatment of trauma caused by exposure to violence.
-Substance abuse treatment and mental health services.
-Screening and risk/needs assessments.
-Youth accountability programs focused on healthy lifestyle choices and prosocial values development.
-Further development of tribally developed “promising programs” that have indicated success in serving tribal youth.

The successful applicant will implement creative methods of providing individualized, culturally specific training and technical assistance to current programs, while also gathering, disseminating, and developing tools and resources that will impact the larger field of tribal youth programs. OJJDP will expect the successful applicant to build on the accomplishments and activities of the current training and technical assistance program and to institute a seamless transition that ensures that tribal youth programs continue to receive high-quality services.

OJJDP will expect the successful applicant to provide training and technical assistance in a culturally sensitive manner that respects tribal sovereignty, understands and appreciates tribal history and customs, recognizes the importance and complexity of indigenous justice systems, and understands juvenile justice issues.

The successful applicant will have an understanding of:
-Juvenile delinquency in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes and the socioeconomic conditions that tribes face when responding to the needs of youth and their families.
-Intertribal relationships and the issues associated with providing technical assistance to tribes whose boundaries encompass multiple jurisdictions involving local, county, state, and federal governments.
-Tribal-local, tribal-state, and tribal-federal relationships and tribal sovereignty. OJJDP-2018-135186

Category 2 – Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative:

The National Intertribal Youth Summit (NIYS) initiative was developed in 2009 to promote long- term improvement in public safety in tribal communities. OJP developed the summits in response to requests from tribal leaders for the development of culturally appropriate programs for tribal youth and their families. OJP conducted the NIYS yearly from 2009 to 2012, bringing tribal youth together to develop their leadership skills and engage them in interactive discussions with tribal elders, leaders and mentors, federal government representatives, youth advocates, and experts on cultural values and community-based solutions to critical public safety issues facing tribal youth.

In 2013, in order to move beyond singular events, OJJDP expanded its commitment to tribal youth leadership development by funding a 4-year cooperative agreement to support multiple regional and national youth gatherings that provided hands-on, intensive training for tribal youth to develop leadership skills and implement youth-driven community service projects. OJJDP now seeks to continue and expand those efforts to provide additional intensive training and mentoring for cohorts of youth leaders who will be trained in critical aspects of juvenile justice and delinquency prevention efforts. These young people will serve as peer leaders to provide leadership development and engagement training, mentoring, support, resources, information, and other technical assistance to targeted tribal youth.

OJJDP will expect the successful applicant to have the skills and experience to recruit a diverse cadre of applicants and mentors, and to build an experiential and intensive curriculum to train and support the youth leaders who will be an integral part of designing and facilitating leadership development opportunities and resources for the targeted high-risk tribal youth.

Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables:

Category 1 – Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance:

The goal of this program is to provide culturally appropriate training and technical assistance to federally recognized tribes with a focus on improving outcomes for tribal youth. Program objectives include the development of a range of assistance to tribes to support and enhance tribal efforts to prevent and reduce juvenile delinquency. The successful applicant will also provide intensive, ongoing training and technical assistance to OJJDP’s tribal grantees to assist them in implementing their funded programs and to develop effective sustainable efforts to improve the lives of tribal youth, their families, and their communities.

The successful applicant should demonstrate the ability to provide or subcontract training and technical assistance for tribal youth-specific programming, including efforts to create, expand, or strengthen tribally driven approaches along the juvenile justice continuum that can range from prevention to intervention and treatment. These may include:

-Delinquency prevention and intervention initiatives that use culturally appropriate strategies to promote protective factors, reduce risk factors, and respond to the specialized needs of tribal youth. These may include youth accountability programs focused on healthy lifestyle choices and prosocial values development, positive youth development and family strength-based program models, truancy reduction and bullying intervention programming, arts and culture-based initiatives, violence prevention programs, and suicide prevention programs. In addition, applicants should be aware of the development and implementation of trauma-informed practices and traditional healing methods that are integrated in programs and services to address child abuse and neglect as well as the effects of childhood trauma or exposure to violence. Applicants should familiarize themselves with the DOJ report on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence.

-Interventions for court-involved tribal youth that may include effective prosecution and courtroom practices, risk/need screening and assessment tools, graduated sanctions, restitution, diversion, home detention, foster and shelter care, and other alternatives to detention, including the development or enhancement of tribal juvenile healing-to-wellness courts. Grant funds cannot be used to service violent offenders. See generally 34 U.S.C. 10612.

-Treatment services for at-risk and high-risk youth and/or services for youth in detention or out-of-home placement that may include alcohol and drug abuse treatment programs; mental health treatment (counseling, referral, and placement); and development of comprehensive screening tools, crisis intervention, intake assessments, treatment team planning, and therapeutic services for co-occurring mental health and substance abuse disorders as well as aftercare and reentry services to successfully reintegrate the youth into the tribal community.

-Development or implementation of programs and services for children who are victims of sex trafficking.

The successful applicant should also be able to deliver training and technical assistance focused on the following key topical areas: strategic planning and program design, improvement or establishment of data collection systems, partnership development, tribal action plan development in regard to alcohol and substance abuse (Tribal Law and Order Act), sustainability planning, inter- and intra-tribal service coordination, and program advisory committee creation and maintenance.

Deliverables for Category 1 – Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance:

To accomplish the goals and objectives identified above, OJJDP will expect the successful applicant to deliver the following:

1. An annual work plan identifying key training and technical assistance events, dates, and deliverables that OJJDP will review and approve. This work plan will include:
a. Intensive training and technical assistance targeted to OJJDP’s tribal programs funded through the Coordinated Tribal Assistance Solicitation (CTAS), specifically Purpose Areas 8 and 9 (approximately 80–100 active grantees each year in various stages of implementation).
b. Planning and implementation of an annual new grantee orientation webinar.
c. Planning and implementation of an annual onsite strategic planning meeting for
new grantees.
d. Development and implementation of a targeted training and technical assistance plan for grantees and nongrantees.
e. Facilitation of ongoing communities of practice with cohorts of grantees engaging in similar work (e.g., tribal detention centers, diversion programs).
f. Support of and coordination with the OJJDP Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative and with any other training and technical assistance providers funded by OJJDP that have a nexus with tribal youth programs and/or tribal healing-to-wellness courts.
g. Development of an annual report of OJJDP-funded programs for tribal youth.

2. Making available training and technical assistance to all federally recognized tribes, including the development of capacity-building tools, regional trainings, and innovative collaborations to meet the stated needs of tribes seeking to improve their youth programming and juvenile justice systems.

3. Maintenance of an existing website that serves as a dynamic, robust portal for information, resources, tools, and requests for training and technical assistance related to programs for tribal youth.

4. Fulfillment of requests for individualized onsite and remote training and technical assistance to be submitted, reviewed, and approved by a standardized process.

5. Provision of a minimum of seven in-person and web-based trainings per year to increase the capacity of tribes to develop, expand, improve, and/or maintain their juvenile justice systems, including tribal juvenile healing-to-wellness courts and tribal youth-specific prevention, intervention, and treatment programming, with an emphasis on tribal-state collaborations to meet the needs of AI/AN children exposed to violence.

6. Development and implementation of a biennial OJJDP Tribal Youth Program national conference that invites and convenes representatives from tribal grantees and all federally recognized tribes to learn about the latest developments in innovative programs for tribal youth and to discuss and address tribal youth-related issues, needs, opportunities for collaboration, and programs.

7. Submission of conference cost approval proposals for all proposed events. NOTE: Event planning as a part of this cooperative agreement must follow all guidance set forth in the OJP policy and guidance for conference approval, planning, and reporting.

Category 2 – Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative:

The goal of this initiative is to directly engage Native American youth and youth-serving programs in efforts to reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors related to juvenile delinquency prevention. The program offers an opportunity for trusted adults to work closely with youth exposed to multiple risk factors. This interaction and experience will be infused with lessons pertaining to personal accountability, skill development and action related to juvenile justice, delinquency prevention, and public safety issues in Indian country. To accomplish this goal, the initiative will work with tribal communities to identify and engage youth with multiple risk factors to participate in learning events that will build youth leadership skills and provide opportunities to create a sustainable community project focused on reducing risk factors for juvenile crime and enhancing protective factors for youth accountability.

The objective of Category 2 is to successfully coordinate and implement a Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative with OJJDP oversight and involvement. This includes but is not limited to the following activities:

-Recruit, train, and support a diverse group of youth leaders who will serve ongoing critical roles throughout the life of this initiative, including participating as planning team members, trainers, peer mentors, and subject-matter experts. This includes intensive trainings on issues related to juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system.

-Develop and implement a series of regional gatherings that provide leadership development training to young Native American people throughout the country. This includes the development of agendas, speaker coordination, and all event logistics (i.e., site location and contract negotiations, registration, travel, and onsite conference and technology logistics).

-Building on these events, work directly with the cohorts of youth participants to guide the implementation of a youth-developed community service project related to juvenile delinquency prevention and intervention issues that emerge from the leadership development training. This may include a community awareness project on opioid abuse, a presentation on positive decisionmaking skills, supporting a drug take-back day, or other related activities.

-Coordinate an ongoing workgroup consisting of tribal youth and adults as well as experts in juvenile justice and tribal youth development to assist in guiding and implementing relevant program content, including expanding youth’s general knowledge of tribal, state, and federal efforts to improve juvenile justice systems and increase positive youth development.

-Ensure the overall initiative will focus on decreasing risk factors and increasing protective factors for juvenile delinquency prevention among tribal youth while promoting accountability. This includes an emphasis on integrating cultural practices and knowledge to strengthen or reconnect AI/AN youth to their cultural traditions.

-Develop and implement an overall communications strategy to disseminate program achievements, educate tribal and other decisionmakers about the contributions of youth leaders, and examine lessons that the initiative has learned.

-Collaborate with existing OJJDP tribal training and technical assistance providers to make leadership training opportunities available to young people being served by OJJDP-funded programs for tribal youth. Establish partnerships and work in conjunction with existing tribal youth development efforts to leverage and expand the most effective culturally appropriate leadership opportunities for program participants.

-Develop and implement a participatory evaluation model to gather critical ongoing feedback from program participants and tribal youth programs for continuous program improvement that incorporates ongoing feedback into program delivery.

Deliverables for Category 2 – Tribal Youth Leadership Development Initiative:

To accomplish the goals and objectives identified above, OJJDP will expect the successful applicant to deliver the following:

1. An annual workplan and timeline to include key deliverables, activities, dates, and responsible parties for OJJDP review and approval.

2. Deliverables related to the creation and support of a diverse group of youth leaders, including application process; experiential and intensive curriculum to train and support the youth leaders; and agreements and contracts for trainers, facilitators, and mentors. This group of youth leaders is expected to be integrally involved in planning and implementing the regional/national gatherings.

3. Host a minimum of six regional onsite gatherings over the award period. This includes the identification and invitation of all speakers, development of youth-driven culturally appropriate agendas, development of an outreach plan and associated materials, application and registration process, travel and logistical information for attendees, all event-related handouts and materials, and all event logistics submitted in advance of each event for feedback and approval by OJJDP.

4. Submit conference cost approval proposals for all proposed events. NOTE: Event planning as a part of this cooperative agreement must follow all guidance set forth in the OJP policy and guidance for conference approval, planning, and reporting.

5. Provide followup support for participants involved in each of the regional gatherings in order to ensure successful implementation of their proposed community service projects. This includes scheduling webinars, conference calls, and onsite visits; convening peer mentoring networks; and other ways of facilitating this support. The focus on followup activities with the youth participating in the regional gatherings is an important component of this initiative.

6. Develop a communications plan that includes media coordination and press releases. All electronic and information technology materials developed under this award must be compliant with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

7. Develop evaluation plan materials.

8. Submit a detailed semi-annual progress report on the status of the initiative that will include a quantitative performance measures report and a narrative describing the progress toward approved goals and objectives, implementation issues, and other information relevant to the success of the initiative. Each year the successful applicant will submit a final, detailed report documenting gatherings held each year, evaluation results, and their findings. This publication should include an executive summary and be suitable for a nontechnical audience, to be disseminated at OJJDP’s discretion.

Evidence-Based Programs or Practices:

OJP strongly emphasizes the use of data and evidence in policymaking and program development in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime victim services.

OJP is committed to:
-Improving the quantity and quality of evidence OJP generates.
-Integrating evidence into program, practice, and policy decisions within OJP and the field.
-Improving the translation of evidence into practice.

OJP considers programs and practices to be evidence-based when their effectiveness has been demonstrated by causal evidence, generally obtained through one or more outcome evaluations. Causal evidence documents a relationship between an activity or intervention (including technology) and its intended outcome, including measuring the direction and size of a change, and the extent to which a change may be attributed to the activity or intervention. Causal evidence depends on the use of scientific methods to rule out, to the extent possible, alternative explanations for the documented change. The strength of causal evidence, based on the factors described above, will influence the degree to which OJP considers a program or practice to be evidence-based.

The OJP CrimeSolutions.gov website and the OJJDP Model Programs Guide website are two resources that applicants may use to find information about evidence-based programs in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime victim services.

Information Regarding Potential Evaluation of Programs and Activities:

The Department of Justice has prioritized the use of evidence-based programming and deems it critical to continue to build and expand the evidence informing criminal and juvenile justice programs to reach the highest level of rigor possible. Therefore, applicants should note that OJP may conduct or support an evaluation of the programs and activities funded under this solicitation. Recipients and subrecipients will be expected to cooperate with program-related assessments or evaluation efforts, including through the collection and provision of information or data requested by OJP (or its designee) for the assessment or evaluation of any activities and/or outcomes of those activities funded under this solicitation. The information or data requested may be in addition to any other financial or performance data already required under this program.

OJJDP training and technical assistance awardee standards. OJJDP has developed the Core Performance Standards for Training, Technical Assistance, and Evaluation to promote among providers the consistency and quality of OJJDP-sponsored training and technical assistance and to advance common expectations of performance excellence. The standards present minimum expectations that providers must meet for effective practice in the planning, coordination, delivery, and evaluation of training. Award recipients must coordinate with OJJDP’s National Training and Technical Assistance Center (NTTAC) in the assessment and delivery of services to ensure the effective use of OJJDP grant funding.

Requirements related to coordination of activities will include, but are not limited to:

-Coordination with OJJDP NTTAC. OJJDP requires all training and technical assistance projects to coordinate their activities with OJJDP NTTAC by complying with all OJJDP/NTTAC protocols to ensure coordinated delivery of services among providers and the effective use of OJJDP grant funding. OJJDP reserves the right to modify these protocols at any time with reasonable notice to the grantee prior to project completion.

-OJJDP-funded webinars. The award recipient must comply with OJJDP’s Webinar Guidelines, as described in the core performance standards. Minimally, OJJDP training and technical assistance providers will submit information to OJJDP NTTAC in advance of all events for the online calendar, use the approved OJJDP presentation template, and record events and provide the final files which are compliant with Section 508 of the Workforce Rehabilitation Act to OJJDP or OJJDP’s representative.

-Training information sharing. OJP will collect information from its program offices on OJP- funded training and technical assistance events. Award recipients must use OJJDP’s standard electronic training request form, submit information to NTTAC on all training events (e.g., name of requestor, description of request, dates of event) 30 days in advance of the event date, and report additional data, as OJJDP requires.

GrantWatch ID#:

GrantWatch ID#: 183589

Number of Grants:

OJJDP expects to make one Category 1 award and one Category 2 award.

Estimated Size of Grant:

-Category 1: Up to $2 million
-Category 2: Up to $500,000

Term of Contract:

Category 1: 12-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2018.

Category 2: 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2018.

OJJDP may, in certain cases, provide additional funding in future years to awards made under Category 1. In making decisions regarding continuation awards, OJP will consider, among other factors, the availability of appropriations, when the program or project was last competed, OJP’s strategic priorities, and OJP’s assessment of both the management of the award (for example, timeliness and quality of progress reports) and the progress of the work funded under the award.

OJJDP will not be issuing continuation funding for awards made under Category 2.

Eligibility:

  • City or township governments
  • County governments
  • For profit organizations other than small businesses
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Private institutions of higher education
  • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • See RFP and/or Grant Guidelines for full eligibility
  • Special district governments
  • State governments

Additional Eligibility Criteria:

Eligible applicants are limited to states (including territories), units of local government, federally recognized tribal governments as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). All recipients and subrecipients (including any for-profit organization) must forgo any profit or management fee.

OJJDP welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant. Any others must be proposed as subrecipients (subgrantees). The applicant must be the entity that would have primary responsibility for carrying out the award, including administering the funding and managing the entire project.

Pre-Application Information:

Applicants must acquire a unique entity identifier (currently, a DUNS number). Obtaining a DUNS number is a free, one-time activity. A DUNS number is usually received within 1-2 business days.

Applicants must acquire or maintain registration with SAM. Each applicant must update or renew its SAM registration at least annually to maintain an active status. SAM registration and renewal can take as long as 10 business days to complete (2 more weeks to acquire an EIN).

Applicants must register with Grants.gov prior to submitting an application.

An application cannot be successfully submitted in Grants.gov until Grants.gov receives the SAM registration information. Once the SAM registration/renewal is complete, the information transfer from SAM to Grants.gov can take as long as 48 hours. OJP recommends that the applicant register or renew registration with SAM as early as possible.

All applications are due by 11:59 p.m. eastern time (ET) on June 18, 2018.

To be considered timely, an application must be submitted by the application deadline using Grants.gov, and the applicant must have received a validation message from Grants.gov that indicates successful and timely submission.

OJP urges applicants to submit applications at least 72 hours prior to the application due date to allow time for the applicant to receive validation messages or rejection notifications from Grants.gov, and to correct in a timely fashion any problems that may have caused a rejection notification.

Applicants receiving an award will be notified by September 30, 2018.

View this opportunity on Grants.gov:
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=OJJDP-2018-13518

Contact Information:

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Grants.gov Customer Support Hotline:
Phone: 800-518-4726 / 606-545-5035
Web: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/support.html
Email: support@grants.gov

National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) Response Center:
Toll-free: 1-800-851-3420
TTY: 301-240-6310 (hearing impaired only)
Fax: 301-240-5830
Web Chat: https://webcontact.ncjrs.gov/ncjchat/chat.jsp
Email: grants@ncjrs.gov

CFDA Number:

16.731

Funding or Pin Number:

OJJDP-2018-13518

URL for Full Text (RFP):

Geographic Focus:

USA: Alabama;   Alaska;   Arizona;   Arkansas;   California;   Colorado;   Connecticut;   Delaware;   Florida;   Georgia;   Hawaii;   Idaho;   Illinois;   Indiana;   Iowa;   Kansas;   Kentucky;   Louisiana;   Maine;   Maryland;   Massachusetts;   Michigan;   Minnesota;   Mississippi;   Missouri;   Montana;   Nebraska;   Nevada;   New Hampshire;   New Jersey;   New Mexico;   New York City;   New York;   North Carolina;   North Dakota;   Ohio;   Oklahoma;   Oregon;   Pennsylvania;   Rhode Island;   South Carolina;   South Dakota;   Tennessee;   Texas;   Utah;   Vermont;   Virginia;   Washington, DC;   Washington;   West Virginia;   Wisconsin;   Wyoming

USA Territories: American Samoa (USA)   Guam (USA)   Puerto Rico (USA)   Virgin Islands (USA)   Northern Mariana Islands (USA)