GRANTWATCH
TRAINING

Find Nonprofit and Small Business Grants

Advance Search

Only Available for Paid Subscribers
Clear Filters
Search Filters
.

NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium 2017-2018

Grants to Kentucky Principal Investigators for STEM Research,
Student Fellowships, and Workforce Development

Agency Type:

Foundation / Corporation

Funding Source:

Add to My Calendar 

NASA Kentucky

Deadline Date:

10/19/17 4:30 PM ET

Description:

Request a Grant Writer

Grants to Kentucky principal investigators affiliated with qualifying institutions to initiate research, support student fellowships, and promote workforce development in STEM disciplines. This program promotes cooperation and networking among education, government, and industry by supporting projects of interest to NASA and Kentucky.

Recruitment and training of US citizens, especially women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities, for careers in aerospace science and technology is a national priority. The NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium supports Kentucky faculty, students, and outreach through the award programs in this RFP that address the national interests of NASA and the state needs of Kentucky.

Types of Grants:

Graduate Fellowships:
NASA Kentucky Graduate Fellowships (GF) recognize and support students addressing the challenges of aerospace research related to NASA’s strategic goals. Research advisors at Affiliate Institutions may apply for a one-year fellowship for a specific graduate student. Research projects must emphasize connections to NASA, address specific goals for the fellowship year, and contribute to program metrics including publications, presentations, and student advancement in disciplines of interest to NASA. Allowable costs include student stipend or salary consistent with recipient institution policies and practices, fringe benefits, tuition and fees, materials and supplies, and student domestic travel.

Undergraduate Fellowships:
NASA Kentucky Undergraduate Fellowships (UF) recognize and support students addressing the challenges of aerospace research related to NASA’s strategic goals. Research advisors at Affiliate Institutions may apply for a one-year fellowship for a specific undergraduate student to conduct 1-on-1 mentored research. Research projects must emphasize connections to NASA, address specific goals for the fellowship year and contribute to program metrics including publications, presentations and student advancement in disciplines of interest to NASA. Fellowships provide salary or stipend, materials and travel for undergrad students to conduct NASA-aligned research. Allowable costs include student stipend or salary, fringe benefits, tuition and fees, materials and supplies up to $500, and student domestic travel up to $1,000.

Team Fellowships:
NASA Kentucky Team Fellowship (TF) awards provide support for higher education student groups participating in design competitions sponsored by NASA or related engineering and science organizations. Example competitions include but are not limited to: NASA Robotic Mining Competition, NASA University Student Launch, AIAA Design/Build/Fly, AUVSI, and RockOn. Fellowships provide materials and travel for student teams participating in NASA-related competitions. Allowable costs include registration fees, materials and supplies, shipping costs to/from competition site, and faculty advisor and student team member domestic travel.

Research Initiation Awards:
NASA Kentucky Research Initiation Awards (RIA) are a flexible funding program for faculty to become familiar with NASA research programs and Mission Directorates, establish and cultivate relationships with NASA scientists, and visit NASA facilities. RIA funding is the first step in the faculty pathway to build capacity to conduct NASA-aligned research. Next steps in the pathway include NASA KY EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Development Grants (RIDG), student support for research through Graduate and Undergraduate Fellowships, and NASA ROSES and other NASA research solicitations. RIA proposals may include travel, experiments to obtain preliminary results, data analysis or manuscript preparation. Any combination of faculty salary, student support, travel, materials and supplies, and corresponding indirect costs may be requested up to the maximum award amount. Preference will be given to early-career faculty and faculty changing research directions. Allowable direct costs include faculty salary, student stipend or salary, fringe benefits, tuition, materials and supplies, and domestic travel. Indirect costs are allowed and unrecovered indirect costs may be used as cost-share.

Mini-Grants:
NASA Kentucky Mini-Grants (MG) provide support for outreach programs at scientific sites (museums, observatories, planetariums, etc.), hosting pre-college students on campus, and group travel to NASA- related events. Examples of mini-grant programs include but are not limited to: outreach programs at planetariums and observatories; pre-college student fieldtrips or workshops designed to recruit STEM students to the affiliate institution in disciplines of interest to NASA; professional development workshops for K-12 STEM teachers; and small group travel to Affiliate Institutions combined with travel to a NASA-related event such as Space Camp, AirVenture, rocketry competition or scientific site. Allowable direct costs include registration and entry fees, materials and supplies, salary and fringe benefits for college student assistants, transportation (buses), and domestic travel expenses for faculty advisor, chaperone and students.

Enhanced Mini-Grants:
NASA Kentucky Enhanced Mini-Grants (EMG) provide support for outreach programs at scientific sites (museums, observatories, planetariums, etc.), hosting pre-college students on campus, and group travel to NASA-related events. Examples of projects suited for enhanced mini-grants include but are not limited to: pre-service middle-school teacher training, museum-based projects for students and the general public, or pre-college STEM competitions. Allowable direct costs include registration and entry fees, materials and supplies, salary and fringe benefits for staff or college student assistants, transportation (buses), and domestic travel expenses for faculty advisor, chaperone and students.

The proposed activity must be aligned with NASA priorities addressed by one or more of the Mission Directorates.

NASA Mission Directorate (MD) Descriptions:

Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) conducts vital research to make air travel more efficient, safe, sustainable, and to uncover leading-edge solutions for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in the United States. ARMD’s fundamental research in traditional aeronautical disciplines and emerging disciplines helps address substantial noise, emissions, efficiency, performance, and safety challenges that must be met in order to design vehicles that can operate in the NextGen. NASA aeronautics has made decades of contributions to aviation. Nearly every aircraft today has a NASA-supported technology on board that helps the vehicle fly more safely and efficiently. Aeronautics research continues to play a vital supporting role to air travel and commerce by enabling game-changing technologies and innovation that allows the U.S. aviation industry to continue to grow and maintain global competitiveness. (www.aeronautics.nasa.gov)

Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) provides the Agency with leadership and management of NASA space operations related to human exploration in and beyond low-Earth orbit. HEO also oversees low-level requirements development, policy, and programmatic oversight. The International Space Station represents the NASA exploration activities in low-Earth orbit. Exploration activities beyond low-Earth orbit include the management of Commercial Space Transportation, Exploration Systems Development, Human Space Flight Capabilities, Advanced Exploration Systems, and Space Life Sciences Research & Applications. The directorate is similarly responsible for Agency leadership and management of NASA space operations related to Launch Services, Space Transportation, and Space Communications in support of both human and robotic exploration programs. (www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/home/index.html)

Science Mission Directorate (SMD) leads the Agency in four areas of research: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics. SMD works closely with the broader scientific community, considers national initiatives, and uses the results of National Research Council studies to define a set of “Big Questions” in each of these four research areas. These questions, in turn, fuel mission priorities and the SMD research agenda. The SMD also sponsors research that both enables, and is enabled by, NASA’s exploration activities. SMD has a portfolio of Education and Public Outreach projects that are connected to its research efforts.

Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) is responsible for developing the crosscutting, pioneering, new technologies and capabilities needed by the agency to achieve its current and future missions. STMD rapidly develops, demonstrates, and infuses revolutionary, high-payoff technologies through transparent, collaborative partnerships, expanding the boundaries of the aerospace enterprise. STMD employs a merit-based competition model with a portfolio approach, spanning a range of discipline areas and technology readiness levels. By investing in bold, broadly applicable, disruptive technology that industry cannot tackle today, STMD seeks to mature the technology required for NASA’s future missions in science and exploration while proving the capabilities and lowering the cost for other government agencies and commercial space activities. Research and technology development take place within NASA Centers, in academia and industry, and leverage partnerships with other government agencies and international partners. (www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/home/index.html)

NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium Strategic Themes:

In January 2015, a Consortium strategic planning session was conducted for the NASA Kentucky Space Grant program and identified three themes for the 2016-2018 program cycle:

Total Solar Eclipse 2017: August 21, 2017 presented a unique opportunity for science, public education, and inspiration. People from Oregon to South Carolina witnessed a total solar eclipse, something not seen in the eastern United States since 1970 and not since 1869 in Kentucky. Eclipse totality traversed a swath of western Kentucky, with an area just west of Hopkinsville seeing the point of greatest eclipse nationwide. This theme also includes long-range preparation for a second total solar eclipse touching western Kentucky in 2024.

Big Data: Addressing cross-cutting technology issues of “Big Data” is imperative to the future of many research fields as investigators find themselves challenged with analyzing and managing exponentially growing datasets. Kentucky space science researchers are pursuing exo-solar discovery, space-based astronomy, and ground-based astronomy that increasingly involve manipulating very large datasets. Other Kentucky researchers have research directions in earth science, atmospheric science, and meteorology that also produce large amounts of data, capture inputs from distributed sensor networks, and/or analyze satellite data over time.

Applied Aerospace: "Applied Aerospace" enables NASA Kentucky to emphasize notable trends among the state’s aerospace industry, including Kentucky’s role as a national manufacturing leader for aerospace products exports, and to support prominent technical and research expertise among faculty and entrepreneurs in engineering, biomedicine, space science, nanotech, physics, energy, and more. This theme advances Kentucky’s many aerospace-related research and training specialties and captures growing student interest in NASA’s progress to innovate the nation’s aviation system, build the deep space SLS rocket, and commercialize space flight and satellite missions to low-Earth orbit and beyond. Students at Consortium institutions have the opportunity to perform aerospace research in areas such as thermal protection systems for spacecraft, ISS experimentation, space science, small satellites, UAV research, long-duration space travel, aviation studies and research, advanced manufacturing, robotics, and nanotechnology, as well as to complete NASA internships.

Longitudinal Tracking of Students:
All students receiving compensation must be reported to NASA KY. Any student receiving $5,000 or more in NASA funding or working 160 hours or more on NASA-supported projects or a combination of both will be longitudinally tracked by NASA for five years using information provided on the NASA KY Student Information Form (SIF). Longitudinally tracked students will need to keep their information current through follow-up correspondence for the 5-year period.

GrantWatch ID#:

GrantWatch ID#: 162053

Estimated Size of Grant:

-Graduate Fellowships: Maximum award level is $45,000 per student per year.
-Undergraduate Fellowships: Maximum award level is $6,000 per student per year.
-Team Fellowships: Maximum award level is $10,000 per team per year.
-Research Initiation Awards: Maximum award level is $15,000 per faculty member per year.
-Mini-Grants: Maximum award level is $5,000 per year.
-Enhanced Mini-Grants: Maximum award level is $15,000 per year.

Term of Contract:

Awards up to one year in the period January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018.

Additional Eligibility Criteria:

Proposals will be accepted from Principal Investigators at NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium Affiliate Institutions collaborating with scientific sites (museums, observatories, planetariums, etc.) or institution recruiters.

Fellowship requests must be made by the Principal Investigator on behalf of students.

Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

US citizenship is required.

The Kentucky Space Grant Consortium consists of 17 academic affiliates and 7 non-academic affiliates across the Commonwealth:

Academic Affiliates:
-Ashland CTC
-Bellarmine University
-Berea College
-Bluegrass CTC
-Centre College
-Eastern Kentucky University
-Hopkinsville CC
-Kentucky State University
-Morehead State University
-Murray State University
-Northern Kentucky University
-Owensboro CTC
-Thomas More College
-University of Kentucky
-University of Louisville
-Dr. John Kielkopf
-University of Pikeville
-Western Kentucky University

Non-Academic Affiliates:
-Aviation Museum of Kentucky
-Innoviator, LLC
-Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation
-Kentucky Science Center
-Kentucky Space, LLC
-Living Arts and Science Center
-Tribo Flow Separations, LLC

Pre-Application Information:

The NASA Office of Education requires cost-share of all state Space Grant consortia, therefore most NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium programs require cost-share. Cost-share must be from non-Federal sources. Students and faculty receiving direct support or reporting effort as cost-share must be US citizens.

Required Cost-Share ($CS:$Award):
-Graduate Fellowships: 1:1, including 12.5% faculty full-time equivalent
-Undergraduate Fellowships: None required
-Team Fellowships: 0.5:1
-Research Initiation Awards: 1:1
-Mini-Grants: None required
-Enhanced Mini-Grants: 1:1

Proposals are due Thursday, October 19, 2017, 4:30 PM ET.

Contact Information:

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Proposal files must be submitted online at:
http://nasa.engr.uky.edu

Dr. Suzanne Weaver Smith, Director
(859) 218-NASA (6272)
nasa@uky.edu

Jacob Owen, Assistant Director
(859) 323-4542
jacob.owen@uky.edu

NASA Kentucky
112 RMB (Robotics)
Lexington, KY 40506-0108

Funding or Pin Number:

RFP-18-001

URL for Full Text (RFP):

Geographic Focus:

USA: Kentucky

Need Help?

Hi, I would love to guide you through the site. Please feel free to call or write.