Find Nonprofit and Small Business Grants

Advance Search

Only Available for Paid Subscribers
Clear Filters
Search Filters

Historic Preservation Restoration Grant (HPRG)

Grants to Arkansas Nonprofits, Agencies and Property
Owners to Preserve and Restore Historic Resources

Agency Type:

State

Funding Source:

Add to My Calendar 

Department of Arkansas Heritage - Arkansas Historic Preservation Program (AHHP)

Deadline Date:

03/09/18

Description:

Request a Grant Writer

Grants to Arkansas nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and private property owners for the preservation and restoration of historic properties. First-time applicants are strongly encouraged to submit a letter of intent in advance of the deadline. This program seeks to address a lack of financial resources as an obstacle to the preservation of the state’s historic resources.

The Historic Preservation Restoration Grant (HPRG) is awarded in three Option categories.

Option 1:

Grants are available to fund renovation and restoration projects that make properties eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.

Option 1 grants are available to nonprofit, local government, and private property owners. Eligible properties must be 1) listed on the Arkansas Register of Historic Places, and/or 2) identified as non-contributing structures in a National Register District. All owners receiving Option I grant funds must agree to submit a completed National Register nomination with their final invoice.

Option 2:

Grants are available to fund approved restoration projects for properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Option 2 grants are available to nonprofit and local government property owners. Private property owners are not eligible for Option 2 grant funding. Examples of eligible organizations include public and private schools, colleges and universities, libraries, museums, historical societies, local service organizations, churches, and city or county governments. Preference will be given to projects that are not eligible for other AHPP grants, such as County Courthouse Restoration Grants, Model Business Grants, Preservation Education Grants, Main Street Arkansas Downtown Revitalization Grants, or Certified Local Government Grants. Any owner receiving Option 2 grant funds must sign and file an easement agreement with the local circuit or county clerk before grant funds are released.

Option 3:

Grants are available to fund approved restoration projects for cemeteries listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Option 3 grants are available to nonprofit organizations (501 (c) 3) and units of local government. If the cemetery is owned by any other entity, the grant may be submitted and administered by an eligible nonprofit or unit of local government on behalf of the cemetery. Examples of eligible organizations include cemetery preservation organizations, public and private schools, colleges and universities, libraries, museums, historical societies, local service organizations, churches, and city or county governments. Preference will be given to projects that are not eligible for other AHPP grants, such as County Courthouse Restoration Grants, Model Business Grants, Preservation Education Grants, Main Street Arkansas Downtown Revitalization Grants, or Certified Local Government Grants.

Authorized Uses of Historic Preservation and Restoration Grants:

Grants cannot be used for property acquisition costs or for reimbursement expenses for work done outside the grant period specified in the grant agreement. Additionally, acquisition costs cannot be used to satisfy cash match requirements.

Grants funds may be used for, but are not limited to, the following types of projects:

Option 1
-Removal of artificial exterior siding and replacement with or repair of original exterior siding.
-Removal of non-historic windows and replacement with original or replications of original windows.
-Removal of historically incorrect or inappropriate additions or modifications to the original
structure, including porches, room additions, ornamentation, inappropriate roofing materials and
replacements of same with historically correct materials.
-Replacement and/or reconstruction of missing historic features, including columns, porches, exterior
ornamentation, chimneys, and exterior architectural details.

Option 2
-Repair or replacement of failed roofs with historically correct materials and appropriate design.
-Repair of failed foundations.
-Repair of failed structural components, i.e. joists, rafters, floors, load-bearing walls, trusses, columns, beams, etc.
-Projects to bring property into compliance with the ADA.
-Repair or replacement of failed masonry.
-Repair or replacement of failed windows with historically correct windows.
-Repair or replacement of failed mechanical, plumbing, and/or electrical system(s) if the existing system(s) jeopardizes the integrity of the property.
-Removal of asbestos or lead paint.
-Repair and/or installation of seismic reinforcement.
-Repair, evaluation and/or protection of archeological resources.

In general, for Option 2 grant applications, highest priority is assigned to projects mitigating a threat to a structure’s integrity and survival. Additionally, it should be stressed that these grants are not intended for general maintenance projects.

Option 3:

Preservation Activities:

Preservation refers to activities that help perpetuate and care for historic burial sites, including planning, maintenance, documentation, and education.

Examples:
-Perform an individual stone survey for entire site
-Develop a preservation plan with a conservator
-Initial site clean-up
-Reset markers in bases
-Archeological consultant to assess boundaries
-Projects to aid in the security of the site
-Perform a vegetation survey
-Comply with ADA minimum standards

Conservation Activities:

Conservation refers to mechanical and chemical process used to treat damaged markers. Examples:
-Clean markers using proper materials and methods
-Repair of broken, chipped, cracked markers by conservator
-Clean and/or repair enclosures such as plot coping, gates, and cast iron fencing

Stabilization Activities:

Stabilization refers to treatments executed to retain the greatest cultural and structural integrity of the artifact and the site overall, with a minimum of intervention into the historic fabric. Examples:
-Projects to arrest erosion
-Projects to control standing water or flooding of property
-Projects to document and stabilize markers until services of conservator can be acquired
-Repair retaining walls
-Repair roads and or walkways

Restoration Activities:

This option may only be used in conjunction with historic building/fencing that may be found on site, such as chapels, mausoleums, vaults, and gatehouses, that can be found in many of the state’s historic cemeteries. Restoration implies significant intervention, which should be avoided whenever possible. When a mausoleum, for example, has deteriorated to the point where partial rebuilding is required, restoration is appropriate. True restoration includes documentation and research to determine the original appearance of the artifact, its structure and the treatment required.

NOTE: In general, the greater the threat a particular problem poses to an object, site or structure’s integrity and survival, the higher the priority it will receive during the grant application evaluation process. Additionally, it should be stressed that these grants are not intended for general maintenance projects.

The Grants Selection Committee uses the following primary criteria to evaluate proposals:
-Degree of urgency and level of threat.
-Historic significance of property.
-Proposed use and local impact the project will have to the community.
-Evidence that the objectives of the project can be achieved within the timeframe set forth by AHPP.
-Evidence that the budget is realistic and reasonable.
-Qualifications and experience of the applicant and contractors participating in the project.
-Past performance of applicant on previous grant projects. Applicant must be in good standing with
the Department of Arkansas Heritage regarding all grants previously received from agencies of the
Department.
-Evidenced support of fund source for matching funds.
-Completeness of application. Incomplete applications will not be considered.


Allowable Expenses
The following is a list of some of the more frequently used allowable costs. To be considered allowable, all costs must appear in the approved work-cost breakdown.
-Historical, architectural, or archeological research necessary to implement and carry out project work.
-Architectural, engineering, or contractor fees necessary to implement and carry out project work.
-Supplies and materials, as indicated in the detailed project description.
-Rental or lease of project equipment.
-Exterior restoration.
-Structural repairs.

GrantWatch ID#:

GrantWatch ID#: 177955

Estimated Size of Grant:

Option 1: Grants are up to $10,000.

Option 2: Grants are $10,000 or more there is no stated maximum grant amount but most awards are between $20,000 – $60,000.

Option 3: Grants of $5,000 to $9,999 are available.

Term of Contract:

For all grants, work must be completed in a one-year timeframe (July 1st through May 31st – roughly the state fiscal year).

Additional Eligibility Criteria:

These grants are available to nonprofit organizations, units of local government, and private property owners.

Please note that eligibility varies by Option.

If the cemetery is owned by any other entity, the grant may be submitted and administered by an eligible nonprofit or unit of local government on behalf of the cemetery.

Examples of eligible organizations include cemetery preservation organizations, public and private schools, colleges and universities, libraries, museums, historical societies, local service organizations, churches, and city or county governments.

Eligibility vs. Fundability:

With limited funding and because AHPP is ultimately concerned with protecting and preserving the state’s historic resources, grant funding recommendations largely favor those project activities which correct conditions that imminently threaten the structural viability of the property — sealing the envelope of the building (roof, window, masonry projects); and addressing failing foundations and other structural issues. Because of federal mandates placed on public buildings, projects involving ADA components also receive priority consideration. Also, conditions which present a hazard to the building’s occupants (unvented gas heaters, fire safety issues, etc.) or to the building itself (hazardous electrical wiring) are also priorities for grant funding.

As a general rule, projects involving sidewalks, interior finishes, correcting inappropriate past “remodels,” etc. in a building that is accessible and structurally sound may be assigned a lower priority and receive no funding. The AHPP staff understands that these are worthy projects and would greatly enhance the public’s use of these properties. Unfortunately, limited funding may mean that while these projects are eligible, they are not necessarily competitive or fundable.

Historic Preservation and Restoration Grants do not reimburse the following costs:
-Any item not listed in the approved work-cost breakdown.
-Deficits.
-Contributions or donations to other organizations or individuals.
-Capital expenditures defined as tangible property costing $100 or more and having a life span of two or more years.
-Entertainment expenses, including refreshments, flowers, reception costs, etc.
-Interest and other financial costs.
-Lobbying expenses.
-New construction (some exceptions apply).
-Interpretive expenses (some exceptions apply).
-New pavement of parking lots, roads or walkways (some exceptions apply).
-Furnishings, draperies, or carpeting.
-Work done prior to grant award and after approved grant end date.
-Installation of artificial siding, incompatible replacement windows, or the use of incompatible materials of any type.
-Real estate, property acquisition costs, or legal filing fees.
-Grant writing or grant administration fees.

Pre-Application Information:

A 2:1 cash match is required for Option 1 and Option 2 Historic Preservation Restoration Grants. AHPP will provide two-thirds of the total project cost and the Applicant must provide the remaining one-third (i.e., a minimum $10,000 grant award requires a cash match of at least $5,000). In-kind labor or material will not be considered. The Grant Recipient must provide certification/documentation of cash match when the grant agreement is signed.

Option 3 grant recipients must provide a 4 to 1 match, which is 20% of the total project cost (i.e., a minimum $5,000 grant award requires a match of $1,250, 50% of which may be in kind materials, services, and/or labor.

First time applicants are strongly urged to submit a Letter of Intent. By filling out a Letter of Intent, any applicant will receive feedback or may receive technical assistance and project development with AHPP staff. Technical assistance and project development may include on-site visits, consultations, explanations, or related printed materials.

The online application submission is due between November 17 and March 9, 2018.

The application online submissions are due by Friday, March 9, 2018.

Contact Information:

Before starting your grant application, please review the funding source's website listed below for updates/changes/addendums/conferences/LOIs.

Joia Burton
joia.burton@arkansas.gov

URL for Full Text (RFP):

Geographic Focus:

USA: Arkansas